fallenskyaboveus:

fancasting meme - characters’ family members who aren’t portrayed (5/9)
Astoria Greengrass


waitingforthelastcenturion:

#literally FUCK. YOU. #i don’t understand why people like my brother think snape is still a good guy #this is him sifting through harry’s memories #the ones that mean the most to him his parents and sirius #and hes happy in these memories #and snape invades them and perverts them with his scowl and prescence #a grown man enjoying toying with an abused childs happy place #hp


jvh1988:

Tom Felton and Evanna Lynch opened the Harry Potter park in Osaka, Japan (July, 14)


Ghosts of the Pacific starring Jake Abel, Tom Felton and Garret Dillahunt. Dir. Brian Falk. Coming soon (x)


“My  m o t h e r  raised me to be bold.”


“With my wits and Cat’s beauty, the world will be yours, sweetling.”


Father and I have larger concerns.


jaimelannister:

I knew what I was doing. I was prepared for a long dance with death.


diddydums:

"The things of the night cannot be explained in the day."

A Farewell to Arms, Ch. XXXIV



Effy’s wardrobe in Skins Fire


I used to think I knew, now I’m not so sure.


Anonyme Question:
"It's a metaphor" I have no doubt that you completely understand and stand by this statement that the act of putting an unlit cigarette in Augustus Waters' mouth is in fact a metaphor. But for some folks, we don't see it asa metaphor, we see it as situational irony, or a simple statement. Please explain how it is a metaphor.

fishingboatproceeds:

Well, a character in a novel saying that something is a metaphor is not the same thing as the author of the novel saying that it’s a metaphor. Gus’s intellectual grasp often exceeds his reach (he calls a monologue a soliloquy, and misuses quite a few of the bigger words in his vocabulary). But I do think the cigarette is a metaphor, albeit a different one for us than it is for him.

Gus’s idea is that the cigarette is a metaphor for illness, and he keeps it unlit and in his mouth as an expression of his power over illness. “You put the killing thing between your teeth but you don’t give it the power to do its killing.” Gus’s thinking here is that HE has the power. This is why he tends to use the cigarette when he’s feeling nervous or powerless. (He’s also using the most famous commercially available carcinogen to make this statement, so obviously there’s a connection there in his mind: Humans can prevent cancer by not smoking; cancer is something we can have power over; your job is not to give cancer the power to kill you; etc.) 

But of course Gus is wrong about all of this, or at least almost all of it. You may have SOME control over whether you die of cancer (you can choose not to smoke), but in most cases humans don’t have control over illness. “You don’t give it the power to do its killing” imagines more agency over illness than we actually have, because in the end much of the fault is in the stars, not in ourselves. So to us, the unlit cigarette is a metaphor for our false perception of control, and our urgent need to feel in control. It’s no coincidence, then, that when Gus’s life is spiraling out of control and he finds himself powerless before fate, he tries (and fails) to buy cigarettes.


somethingofawolf:

sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 

Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick

These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 

I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.

This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 

These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 

Perfection